Wednesday, September 15, 2004

A Little Boy Plays

This is one of my favorite pictures of all time. It's a simple snap that captures the innocence of a little guy at play. I took this one of our youngest, Noah, a year ago July when we went to the Pittock Conservation Area near Woodstock, Ontario to watch his aunt in a dragon boat race.

He was almost 3 at the time, and attention spans being what they are at that age, he couldn't possibly care less about what was going on across the water. Immediately beneath his feet, however, it was quite a different story. Another one of those little moments that speaks volumes.

8 comments:

Diva said...

Precious! Thank you

Jenny said...

I love it. It really captures the essence of being a toddler.

Rich Rosenthal II said...

That shirt didn't come home white.

Tara said...

Yes, but did it make it home dry?
Tara

jeff said...

Hello.

You gave a talk in Nikky Kelvin's Writing class last year to some MIT students. I was one of them and I just found you here on Blogger. Anyway, I'm still at Western and I'm taking a Journalistic Writing course we have offered this year. It's taught by Mary Doyle who you may know from the LFP. I just thought I'd drop you a line and let you know someone you talked to is pursuing this writing thing a little further.

Janet said...

It's pictures like these that remind me why I sometimes long to have my childhood back so badly.

Carmi said...

Thanks for the lovely sentiments, everyone.

Rich: You are correct. It had enough sand on it to reduce the flow out of the drain that's connected to our washing machine.

TLJ: Nope. It was soaked too. Once he gained enough confidence to wade into the water, it didn't take long for the water to wick up from the bottom. He didn't seem to mind. And as it was a hot day, neither did we. If only we could all be so carefree about our clothes!

Carmi said...

Jeff, thank you for letting me know you're pursuing the life of a writer. I'm so glad you enjoyed my talk, and hope you continue to keep me updated on your progress. It's an incredibly rewarding feeling to know you can impact the world around you with something as simple as strung-together words. That thought still amazes me.