Sunday, December 12, 2004

Soft and fluffy

When you look really closely at something, you often see things that you would have otherwise missed. We move so fast in today's world that I find most of us don't take the time to observe the little things. This picture reinforces why it's worth slowing down every once in a while.

One fine Sunday morning - I remember it was a Sunday morning because I was really enjoying the soft light of an overcast day beside the east-facing patio door - I was taking some generic pictures of some flowers when I decided to zoom as far as my lens would allow me without actually touching the thing. I didn't think it was technically feasible - those stamens don't really take too kindly to staying within the miniscule depth of field - but I figured all I was risking was some film and some time.

I'm glad I did. I realized there's a lot more going on in that little, dying world than I ever thought possible. I've never looked at flowers the same way since. I hope - after you click on the picture to view the enlarged version - that it changes your perspective a bit as well.

12 comments:

Anonymous said...

Veda
(h-blahblah,vaza,blogspot,com)
said:

I love these close ups, really, I do! This is awesome! What's that line on the center-ish one? Splitting? ...wild

MoreMore!!!
:)

Kicking Bitch said...

And they are sexual organs to boot!

DeAnn said...

Well, it certainly gives me a new perspective on flowers, because I have never seen it like that before. It's interesting what taking something three-dimensional and putting it into a square box -- thus, cutting parts out -- does to your perception of it.

I like it very much.

twenty something said...

Love that picture Carmi!

bmh said...

Wow-- what a great picture. Certainly makes me stop and think about the little things and my place in the world.

Mellie Helen said...

Look at all that texture, and the variances of light and color. And all packaged so small! Great shot, Carmi.

Mark said...

Micro-world! Quite a few of my colleagues are micro-biologists and some of the pics they take as part of their work are beautiful!

Trillian said...

I will never "stop and smell the flowers" in quite the same way again!

Kate said...

I look forward to more of these.
Question though: How many shots do you find that you have to take in order to get one good one?

L said...

lovely photograph -- and I agree with the sentiment! I hope you post more photos of things that are usually overlooked...

Leanne said...

You have the most amazing perspectiveon life Carmi... it is reflected in your photos. Love it :)

Carmi said...

Thanks to you all for your overwhelming support. You've motivated me to keep the photos coming. Watch for more in the days and weeks to come. I've got lots!

VEDA: I'm not sure what the line is in the middle. I think it has something to do with how the thing reproduces. I know...I should know more about my subjects!

DEANN: I've always loved the camera's ability to play with reality by compartmentalizing one's view of the world. When I was a kid, I'd make a rectangle out of my hands and "crop" my view of whatever else was around me.

TRILLIAN: If my words or photos cause folks to shift their perspectives a bit, then I've done my job. Every time I read something, I hope the writer has the ability to move me as well.

CHELLEE: Some shots just seem to "work" the first time out. Others need to be played with a bit. I always overshoot, just to be sure. Once I've set everything up - which can take ages - it's just as easy for me to shoot 10 shots as it is to shoot one. So I try different settings, poses, magnification levels, whatever strikes my fancy. The typical pose is usually bracketed - three shots, one under-exposed, one over-exposed, one that averages the two, and I'll often do a few poses per session. Typically, I'll burn a roll of 24 in one session.