Saturday, July 26, 2008

He's dead, Jim


Dead ivy on concrete
London, ON, July 2008

I took this toward the back of a crumbling parking lot in downtown London. The brilliantly blue sky overhead stood in stark contrast to the gray scene that surrounded me at ground level.

I didn't originally take this image as a monochrome shot. But as so often happens, there was just no color there to begin with. Further evidence that we're remarkably adept at sucking the life out of a place when we don't care to try harder.

Your turn: Scenes that are naturally grim. Please discuss. (And please click here to visit this week's Thematic Photographic entry if you haven't already done so. We're exploring the monochrome world this week, and we'd like you to join us on our quest.)

6 comments:

MorahMommy said...

This reminds me a little of the Flintstones. The multi layer highway that Fred and Wilma would go on when they were going on vacation. Okay, I know it's a real stretch...but imagine it a highway for ants! :-)

Vesper de Vil said...

awesome! i adore photos of factories. have you ever seen the film, All the Real Girls? best shots of factories!!!

Gord Harrison: Crooner said...

the vines (of ivy?) are pretty hardy; they can survive in such bare surroundings.

if i had to answer, what will last longer? concrete or ivy? i'd put my money on the ivy.

cheers,

gord h.

Christine said...

This is the neatest picture! I looked at it for a long time trying to figure it out before I read the caption.

Lori said...

I'm with you. I hate to see old things - or not so old things - crumbling and falling.

The thing I find dispairing? Old, abandoned farm houses and barns along the roadside. You know at one time they were filled with love and laughter...and I wonder what happened that they are left to die and fall apart.

Sorry it's been so long between visits. I always think I'm going to have more time in the summer, but this year...I just haven't. Hope all is well in your world and with your family!

lissa said...

Inherent grimness lies in the sight of a cemetary. Maybe it's the cognitive aspect as well, but I think a cemetary in winter is one of the bleakest sights I can imagine.

That, and a broken-down park, one that used to hold the vibrance of children playing but is now somehow condemned or unvisited.

Makes me want to list all the things that AREN'T grim just to counter these visions in my head!