Monday, July 16, 2007

A lamp and a lesson


Light from above
Montreal, QC, December 2006 [Click to embiggen]

The next time you're in a hotel, condominium lobby or any other public or semi-public space, I hope you'll take a moment to scan the fixtures in the room. The lamps, tables, couches are usually fairly benign, designed to fade into the background and not offend anyone in the process.

Yet sometimes a closer look reveals something else. The light on this lamp base seemed so soft and transitional that I couldn't not take a picture of it.

Hmm, maybe this little self-lesson wasn't just limited to lamps.

Your turn: Are you ever pleasantly surprised when you look at an otherwise ordinary scene or, gasp, even a person? Do tell...

16 comments:

BreadBox said...

Carmi,
I love this photo, and the one below of the pastel Adirondack chairs.
N.

Anna said...

Thanks for stopping by my blog and thanks for the advice also!!!!

Oracle said...

Thanky you for your comments kind sir I was quietly chuffed with my little Story

Heidi said...

My first thought was to comment on how I look at my husband and am so often amazed when I look. But he is no "ordinary" person in my life.

I was recently back in my hometown where I grew up. It is a place I do not frequent nowadays. When I was driving around and came upon our old house, it was one of those ordinary looks that turned into much more. Details flooded into my eyes and it was quite extraordinary.

kenju said...

Like Heidi, whenever I go back to a place that I knew as a child or a young person, I am amazed at the difference in the way it really looks as opposed to the way it was lodged in my mind and memories.

Sonia said...

Love this beautiful lamp!

Thanks Carmi for the visiting and nice comment!

carli said...

Seriously, if you ever look closely at an OREO cookie, the design is really quite nice.

Bev Sykes said...

I was born and raised in San Francisco. AT some time during my adulthood, I happened to look UP at the buildings I knew so well and was amazed to discover what wonderfully ornate things there were decorating those familiar buildings.

gautami tripathy said...

Children always make me smile. No matter what shape and size. No matter what my mood is.

I did write that poem which formede in my mind from your Density, squared post.

Do check it out.
Click spaced Out.

Or click my name to go to my blog!

Bella Rossa said...

Just gott say that I love that you used the word "embiggen."

Geri said...

For me it's my grandson. The first year of his life I took a picture every single day. I put them in a book(really 2) and gave one to his mom and I kept one. I had such a gift,seeing the silly small changes and the training of my eye to look for the wee things. Now I try to be vigilant,but occasionally I look up and am awed by the little man I see there,with his secret little face. Great blog,keep it up!

Joy T. said...

I was getting pretty bad about not taking the time to look people in the eye when I talked to them. Not sure when I got so lazy about it, but I am now trying hard to get back into the habit of it. I am always amazed by people's eyes. Even the happiest of people tells a story with their eyes.

Holly Schwendiman said...

I know exactly what you've described and I love it as well. You'd be happy to know I thought of you SO much on my recent trip. Almost every photo I took I thought "Wow Carmi would love this!"

Hugs,
Holly

Michael Manning said...

Yes! But I owe that to my late Professor of Philosophy Peter Umbenhauer who once gave us an assignment to walk around town and quietly observe people's facial expressions, their eyes, the corners of their mouth, their overall mood. It was a mind blower!

Chad Oneil said...

I know what you mean. One time I was photographing a friend downtown. There was this allyway that had some doors and other industrial things lining the sides of it. I began to realize just how cool of backgrounds these odly painted things made. I then utilized these very ordinary, overlooked things as backdrops.

I've also noticed it while filling my car up with gas. Some people scratch up the black areas surrounding where the pumps are held with their keys (if that makes sense, I'm having a hard time saying what I want to say tonight) anyway, the scratches created a unique image that I so often times didn't even "see".

It's amazing what you see, when you really "see".

I guess that's what being a photographer is all about ;)

Dara said...

Yes. Seeing the extraordinary in the ordinary is a pleasant surprise. Being able to share that with another is a gift.