Tuesday, June 09, 2009

Wired sky


Overhead
London, ON, April 2009


Ever point your lens skyward only to realize there's a mess of overhead wires in your way? The perfectionist in me used to not even bother. These days, though, I'm inclined to shoot it anyway. Life isn't always perfect, after all, so it makes eminent sense that my photography should follow suit.

Your turn: Discovering imperfection. Please discuss.

9 comments:

Awareness said...

I like the drama of a photo like this. The wires add reality to an ethereal vista.

kenju said...

The horizontal lines add to the serenity of the photo.

bobbie said...

Know what you mean. I always used to avoid things like that, or at the very least, crop it out. But reality has finally caught up to me.

bobbie said...

Know what you mean. I always used to avoid things like that, or at the very least, crop it out. But reality has finally caught up to me.
Or I to it.

Love 2B Homeschoolers said...

The wires add to that beautiful silhouette.

Gwen said...

And here's my twisted prairie girl perspective: my first thought is "someone should prune that tree with the wires running through it". Heh heh.

Nikki-ann said...

I'm in the countryside (nearly!), so it's only ever one or two wires in the shot (though I try to avoid them) so they're often annoying! Your picture works though because there's so many of them and they're silhouetted :) Nice one.

David said...

during the little house on the prairie days this was not a problem. Than again they did not have small cameras, and walking down the street meant you had to dodge the horse manure. I can't decide
if its harder to scape poo off my shoe or to learn photoshop to scrub wires from my pics

Mojo said...

Happens to me all the time. Not just power lines, but things that I think are too far away to be a factor, only to find out that the compression you get through a long lens makes then... a factor. In one case, back in my film days, I shot what would have been a near perfect outdoor portrait... except for the tree growing out of the subject's head.

It happens.